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Best Film Cameras for Beginners 2023

Updated: Nov 13, 2023

Top Starter Models for Analogue Novices

If you're keen to explore the fascinating world of film photography, you've come to the right place. In this exclusive article, Michael Elliott has chosen ten of the best film cameras for budding amateurs who want to experience the beauty and nostalgia of analogue photography. Whether you're looking for a well-known classic or a rare gem, Michael will help you discover the amazing variety of film cameras, and inspire you to unleash your creativity and achieve photographic excellence.


 

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How to Choose the Best Beginner Film Camera for You

Choosing a film camera can be a daunting task, especially if you are new to film photography. There are many factors to consider, such as the type, format, features, condition, and price of the camera. Here are some tips to help you find the best beginner film camera for you:

  • Decide on the type of camera. There are different types of film cameras, such as SLR, rangefinder, point-and-shoot, TLR, and medium format. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, depending on your preferences and needs. For example, SLR cameras offer more control and versatility, but they are also heavier and more complex. Point-and-shoot cameras are easy and convenient, but they have less creative options and lower image quality. Rangefinder cameras are compact and quiet, but they have a separate viewfinder and limited lens choices. TLR cameras are unique and fun, but they have a reversed image and a fixed lens. Medium format cameras produce stunning images, but they are also bulky and expensive.

  • Choose the film format. The most common film format is 35mm, which is widely available and affordable. It also offers a good balance between image quality and portability. However, if you want higher resolution and larger prints, you might want to consider medium format or large format film, which have bigger negatives and finer details. However, these formats are also more expensive and require more specialized equipment and processing.

  • Look for the features you need. Depending on your level of experience and interest, you might want to look for certain features in your film camera, such as manual or automatic exposure, focus, and winding; interchangeable or fixed lenses; built-in or external light meter; flash or hot shoe; self-timer or remote control; and so on. These features can affect the ease of use, functionality, and creativity of your film camera.

  • Check the condition of the camera. Before buying a film camera, you should always inspect it carefully and test it if possible. Look for any signs of damage, wear, or malfunction, such as scratches, dents, fungus, haze, dust, oil, leaks, cracks, corrosion, or broken parts. Make sure the shutter, aperture, focus, and winding mechanisms work properly and smoothly. Check the battery compartment, film chamber, and lens mount for any dirt or corrosion. If the camera has a light meter, make sure it is accurate and responsive. If the camera has a lens, make sure it is clean and clear, without any scratches, fungus, haze, or dust. If the camera has a viewfinder, make sure it is bright and clear, without any dirt, fog, or misalignment.

  • Compare the prices of the camera. The price of a film camera can vary depending on the type, format, features, condition, and popularity of the camera. You can find film cameras for as low as £10 or as high as £10,000, depending on the model and the seller. You should do some research and compare the prices of different cameras online or in local stores, and look for the best value for your money. You should also consider the cost of film, processing, and accessories, which can add up over time.

Film Camera Tips for Beginners

If you are new to film photography, you might feel overwhelmed or intimidated by the process and the results. However, film photography can also be very rewarding and enjoyable, if you follow some simple tips and tricks. Here are some film camera tips for beginners to help you get started:

  • Choose the right film for your camera and your style. There are many types of film available, with different characteristics and effects. You should choose the film that matches your camera's format and your personal preference. For example, if you have a 35mm camera, you should use 35mm film, which comes in different speeds, colours, and grains. The speed of the film, measured in ISO or ASA, determines how sensitive it is to light. The higher the speed, the more light it needs, but also the more grainy it is. The colour of the film, either colour or black and white, affects the mood and tone of your photos. The grain of the film, either fine or coarse, affects the texture and sharpness of your photos. You should experiment with different films and see what suits your style and vision.

  • Learn the basics of exposure. Exposure is the amount of light that reaches your film, and it is determined by three factors: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Aperture is the opening of the lens, which controls how much light enters the camera. Shutter speed is the duration of the shutter, which controls how long the light hits the film. ISO is the sensitivity of the film, which affects how much light it needs. You should learn how to balance these three factors to achieve the correct exposure for your photos. You can use a light meter, either built-in or external, to measure the light and suggest the best settings. You can also use an exposure guide, either printed or online, to estimate the settings based on the lighting conditions. You can also use the sunny 16 rule, which states that on a sunny day, you should set your aperture to f/16 and your shutter speed to the reciprocal of your ISO. For example, if your ISO is 100, your shutter speed should be 1/100s. You can then adjust the aperture or shutter speed by one stop for different lighting situations, such as cloudy, overcast, or shade.

  • Practice your focus and composition. Focus and composition are two important aspects of photography, which affect the clarity and aesthetics of your photos. You should practice your focus and composition skills to improve your photos. To focus, you should use the focusing ring on your lens, or the focusing aid on your viewfinder, to adjust the sharpness of your subject. You should also consider the depth of field, which is the range of distance that is in focus, and how it affects your photos. To compose, you should use the rule of thirds, which is a guideline that divides your frame into nine equal parts, and suggests placing your subject or points of interest along the lines or intersections. You should also consider the angle, perspective, and framing of your photos, and how they affect your photos.

How Much Does a Film Camera Cost?

The cost of a film camera can vary depending on many factors, such as the type, format, features, condition, and popularity of the camera. You can find film cameras for as low as £10 or as high as £10,000, depending on the model and the seller. However, the cost of a film camera is not only the initial purchase price, but also the ongoing expenses of film, processing, and accessories, which can add up over time. Here are some estimates of how much a film camera can cost in 2023:

  • The cost of a film camera. The average cost of a film camera is around £100, but it can range from £10 to £10,000, depending on the model and the seller. You can find cheap film cameras at thrift stores, garage sales, or online auctions, but they might not be in good condition or working order. You can also find expensive film cameras at specialty stores, online dealers, or collectors, but they might be rare, vintage, or high-end models. You should do some research and compare the prices of different cameras online or in local stores, and look for the best value for your money. You should also check the condition and functionality of the camera before buying it, and ask for a warranty or a return policy if possible.

  • The cost of film. The average cost of film is around £10 per roll, but it can range from £5 to £30, depending on the type, brand, and quantity of film. You can find cheap film at discount stores, online retailers, or bulk orders, but they might not be of good quality or expired. You can also find expensive film at speciality stores, online dealers, or niche brands, but they might be of high quality or rare. You should choose the film that matches your camera's format and your personal preference, and experiment with different films and see what suits your style and vision. You should also store your film properly, in a cool and dry place, and use it before the expiration date.

  • The cost of processing. The average cost of processing is around $15 per roll, but it can range from £7.50 to £30, depending on the type, service, and location of processing. You can find cheap processing at local labs, online services, or mail-in orders, but they might not be of good quality or fast. You can also find expensive processing at speciality labs, online services, or local orders, but while they may be of high quality, they may not have a fast turnaround time. You should choose the processing that matches your film type and your personal preference, and compare the prices and reviews of different services online or in local stores. You should also consider the options of scanning, printing, and archiving your photos, and how they affect the cost and quality of your photos.

  • The cost of accessories. The average cost of accessories is around £50, but it can range from £10 to £100, depending on the type, quality, and quantity of accessories. You can find cheap accessories at thrift stores, garage sales, or online auctions, but they might not be of good quality or compatible with your camera. You can also find expensive accessories at speciality stores, online dealers, or brand names, but they might be of good quality or compatible with your camera. You should choose the accessories that match your camera type and your personal preference, and look for the ones that enhance your photography experience and results. Some common accessories are polarizing filters, colour filters for contrast in black and white photography, and light balancing filters to adjust a tungsten balanced film to daylight use and vice versa.

 

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The Best Film Cameras for Beginners for an Affordable Price

Olympus OM-1

Olympus OM-1 camera

The Olympus OM-1 is a legend among compact cameras, loved by photographers for its portability and simplicity. This 35mm SLR is fully mechanical and has a huge range of lenses to choose from, making it a great option for those who want an easy introduction to film photography. The OM-1 was introduced in 1972 as the first model in the Olympus OM series, which aimed to create a smaller and lighter system than the existing SLRs at the time⁴. The OM-1 has a built-in meter that operates with batteries, but it can also work without them at all shutter speeds. The OM-1 has a classic design and a smooth operation that will make you fall in love with film photography.



Voigtländer Bessa R

Voigtlander Bessa R camera with Ultron 35mm f/1.7 lens mounted

Bringing back the classic rangefinder experience, the Voigtlander Bessa R is a versatile 35mm camera with a Leica screw mount. Its bright and clear viewfinder offers multiple framelines for different focal lengths, from 35mm to 90mm. The Voigtlander Bessa R was introduced in 2000 as the first model of the Bessa series, which were produced by Cosina in Japan. The Voigtlander Bessa R has a 0.68x magnification viewfinder that can display exposure information with LED indicators. It also has a fast and accurate shutter that can reach speeds up to 1/2000s. It can use a wide range of lenses, from vintage Leica thread mount lenses to modern Voigtlander ones. The Voigtlander Bessa R is a reliable and affordable camera that will delight you with its simplicity and quality.



Pentax K1000

Pentax K1000 camera

A true icon in the history of film cameras, the Pentax K1000 is a reliable choice for beginners. Its manual controls teach you the basics of exposure, while its sturdy build ensures it can last for years. The K1000 was launched in 1976 as a stripped-down version of the Pentax KM, which itself was based on the Pentax Spotmatic. The K1000 has a simple and intuitive layout, with a match-needle meter in the viewfinder that shows you the correct aperture and shutter speed combination. The K1000 is fully mechanical and only needs a battery for the meter, so it can work even in extreme conditions. The K1000 is compatible with a wide range of Pentax K-mount lenses, which are known for their quality and affordability.


Canon AE-1 Program

Canon AE-1 Program camera

The Canon AE-1 Program represents the peak of film camera technology, offering fully automatic exposure as well as manual options. With a bright viewfinder and a wide selection of lenses available, it provides a smooth and enjoyable shooting experience. The AE-1 Program was introduced in 1981 as an upgrade to the popular Canon AE-1, which was one of the first SLRs to feature a microprocessor. The AE-1 Program added a program mode that automatically sets both aperture and shutter speed according to the lighting conditions, making it easier for beginners to get good results. The AE-1 Program also has a shutter priority mode and a manual mode, giving you more creative control over your exposure. The AE-1 Program uses Canon FD-mount lenses, which are plentiful and versatile.


Nikon FM2

Nikon FM-2 Camera

For those who appreciate mechanical quality, the Nikon FM2 stands out with its titanium shutter and rugged construction. This dependable and versatile 35mm SLR gives beginners confidence, making it easy to enter the world of film. The FM2 was released in 1982 as an improved version of the Nikon FM, which was designed as a compact and professional alternative to the Nikon F series. The FM2 has a fast and durable shutter that can reach speeds up to 1/4000s and flash sync up to 1/250s. The FM2 has a match-needle meter that works with batteries, but it can also operate without them at all shutter speeds except bulb. The FM2 accepts Nikon F-mount lenses, which are among the best in the industry.


Minolta X-700

Minolta X-700 camera

The Minolta X-700 offers a wonderful mix of manual control and automation, making it a versatile and reliable companion for those venturing into film photography. Its intuitive interface and vibrant viewfinder make framing shots a joy. The Minolta X-700 was released in 1981 as the flagship model of the Minolta X series, which were aimed at advanced amateurs and professionals. The Minolta X-700 has a program mode that automatically sets both aperture and shutter speed for optimal exposure, as well as an aperture priority mode and a manual mode for more control. The Minolta X-700 also has an exposure lock button, an exposure compensation dial, and an LED display in the viewfinder that shows the metering information. The Minolta X-700 uses Minolta MD-mount lenses, which are plentiful and high-quality.


Yashica Mat 124G

Yashica Mat-124G camera

Moving on, we come to medium format - a genuinely stunning experience. With the Yashica Mat 124G charms with its twin-lens reflex design, and a large waist-level viewfinder, its lovely square format medium format camera invites you to slow down and think carefully about your shots. The Yashica Mat 124G was introduced in 1970 as the final model in the Yashica Mat series, which were inspired by the Rolleiflex TLRs. The Yashica Mat 124G uses 120 or 220 film to produce 6x6cm square images that have more detail and tonality than 35mm film. The Yashica Mat 124G has a fixed 80mm f/3.5 lens that is coupled with an 80mm f/2.8 viewing lens. It also has a built-in light meter that works with batteries and a crank film advance that prevents accidental double exposures.


Lomography LC-A 120

Lomo LC-A 120 camera

For those who want to experiment with different styles, the Lomography LC-A 120 is a wide angle, fixed focal length medium format camera that encourages creativity. You can play with multiple exposures and colour filters, creating stunning and surreal images with ease. The Lomography LC-A 120 was launched in 2014 as a medium format version of the Lomography LC-A, which was a remake of the Soviet LOMO LC-A. The Lomography LC-A 120 uses 120 film to produce 6x6cm square images with a distinctive vignette and saturation. The Lomography LC-A 120 has a 38mm f/4.5 lens that can focus from 0.6m to infinity. It also has an automatic exposure system that adjusts the aperture and shutter speed according to the light level. The Lomography LC-A 120 is a fun and quirky camera that will inspire you to explore your artistic vision.


Kodak Retina IIa

Kodak Retina IIA camera

Taking us back to the vintage era, the Kodak Retina IIa oozes charm and nostalgia. This classic rangefinder delights with its collapsible lens, offering a perfect balance of style and function for your artistic pursuits. The Kodak Retina IIa was introduced in 1951 as an improved version of the Kodak Retina II, which was the first camera to use 35mm film in cassettes. The Kodak Retina IIa has a coupled rangefinder that helps you focus accurately, and a bright frame viewfinder that shows you the composition. The Kodak Retina IIa has a Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50mm f/2 lens that can be folded into the body when not in use, making it more compact and portable. The Kodak Retina IIa is a beautiful and elegant camera that will transport you to a different time and place.


Kiev 60

Kiev 60 camera

Experience the power and precision of a medium format SLR with the Kiev 60, a Soviet adaptation of the German Pentacon Six. This hefty camera offers manual control and TTL metering, as well as a Pentacon 6-type bayonet mount that can accommodate a wide range of lenses. You can also choose between a pentaprism or a waist-level finder, depending on your preference. The Kiev 60 is a reliable and versatile camera that will challenge and reward you with its mechanical quality and performance. The Kiev 60 was introduced in 1984 as an upgrade to the Kiev 6C, which was a copy of the Pentacon Six made by the Arsenal factory in Ukraine. The Kiev 60 has a shutter speed range from 1/2s to 1/1000s, plus bulb mode, and can sync with flash at 1/30s. The Kiev 60 uses 120 film to produce 6x6cm square images that have more resolution and depth than 35mm film. The Kiev 60 has a Volna-3 MC 80mm f/2.8 lens that is joined by an Arsat MC C-80mm f/2.8 in the normal lens line up. If you want an upgrade on those, you have a world of Carl Zeiss Jena lenses, from the Flektogon 50mm f/4 up to the Sonnar 300mm f/4, and if you find you have even more money, you can spend a lot on some of the impeccable Schneider Kreuznach glass, including the legendary Curtagon 60mm f/3.5 lens.


Conclusion

We hope this article about the best film cameras for beginners in 2023 gave you some insight into the wonderful world of film photography, and that it inspired you to start your own analogue journey. Whether you are looking for a simple and reliable camera, a creative and fun camera, or a classic and elegant camera, we are sure you will find one that suits your taste and style among these ten cameras. So, don't hesitate to pick up your favourite camera and start shooting, as there are countless moments waiting to be captured on film. Happy shooting!

 

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Guest
Aug 10, 2023

Well I don't exactly agree with the listing above. I just feel you've been, in my opinion, somewhat obvious in your choices. You've missed out the many great Canon slr film cameras, from the 500 and 300 series. The 500N, the 300V and 300X, or the Canon ELAN series. These Canon film cameras won't cost the film beginner anywhere near the choices you have selected above. There is a huge range of Canon EF lenses to choose from, which again won't cost the earth. EF lenses also fit on Canon APS C bodies too. To me your list is one containing so called 'classic' film cameras, not too sure why you went down this route. What's classic isn't necessarily class…

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Guest
Jul 26, 2023
Rated 5 out of 5 stars.
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