The Macro View

Capturing the colours, textures and essence of the riverside, this series is a study of found objects along the Thames riverside between Enderby's Wharf and Morden Wharf, at low tide.

Shot on Kodak Ektachrome 100S (expired) film stock for the first half of the set, the earthy and faded colours of both natural and manmade objects is brought out, and the intrinsic roughness is accentuated by the graininess of the film. The second half of the set is shot on fresh Kodak Ektachrome 100, with the smoother effect of having fresh film highlighting the smoothness within the objects, even where there are sharp edges, and allowing the liquid reflections to glisten more, while retaining a restrained saturation.

Using the Kiev 60 TTL SLR system, the Carl Zeiss Jena Flektogon wide-angle 50mm f/4.0 lens was paired with a 30mm macro extension tube. This allowed for super close up focus (most of the images shown here saw the outer filter on the lens practically touching the foreground objects), while maintaining a large angle of view so as to capture as much of the surrounding detail as possible. Depth of field was razor thin, so as to pick out and forefront one element of the scene.

The first five images are different views of a log that had washed up and beached close to the river wall. With pits and bumps and valleys and crevices all over, it provided a wealth of opportunities to find beautiful landscapes within it. Some look like lakes, others like rock faces, or hills, and yet others like miniature rock formations.

 

The images following those try to highlight a unique texture, object or colour found along the way from Enderby's Wharf to Morden Wharf. From abandoned ropes used to tie up boats, cables from the old Alcatel cable factory, and shards of glass both small and large to rocks and tires, each has its own unique identity, each either a permanent, semi-permanent or temporary fixture of the ever changing riverside landscape.

Shop The Macro View series on my store.

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